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Extreme Measures is a BOMA Floor Measurement Standards expert. We host this help desk as a free resource for the real estate community at large. Neither BOMA or Extreme Measures is responsible for the information, comments or opinions contained herein. For complete information, please refer to the appropriate BOMA publications themselves, available at the BOMA Store Online.

BOMA Industrial Standard Overview

Introduction

In 2004, BOMA and SIOR (The Society of Industrial and Office Realtors) released a collaborative document called the "Standard Methods For Measuring Floor Area in Industrial Buildings", commonly referred to as BOMA/SIOR 2004. Five years later, in 2009, the Standard received ANSI approval and the Standard was re-published and renamed to reflect it's new ANSI designation. BOMA/SIOR 2009 is otherwise identical to the 2004 predecessor.

It is anticipated that BOMA/SIOR 2009 will undergo another revision in the near future. The purpose of this revision will be to align the document, it's format and definitions with the other, newer BOMA Standards.

The standard outlines two distinct methods of measuring industrial properties; the Exterior Wall Methodology (Method A) and the Drip Line Methodology (Method B). BOMA/SIOR 2009 functions similarly to the BOMA 1996 office standard (ANSI/BOMA Z65.1-1996) with the principal difference being the Measure Line. BOMA/SIOR 2009 also makes specific recommendations with respect to finished and unfinished mezzanines.

BOMA/SIOR 2009 - Method A

Known as the Exterior Wall Methodology, Method A measures to the outside of exterior walls (measure line) to calculate areas. Method A is arguably more popular then Method B. Certain features of an industrial building are excluded from the calculation of area, including canopies, unenclosed connecting links, unenclosed exterior staircases or fire escapes and unenclosed shipping/receiving platforms. The main condition for an area to be excluded is that it exists beyond the measure line.

BOMA/SIOR 2009 - Method B

Known as the Drip Line Methodology, Method B measures to the most exterior drip line at the perimeter of the roof system to calculate areas. Method B is generally intended for wall-less industrial structures usually found in warmer climates.

While Method A is the most conventional approach for measuring industrial buildings, Method B has gained popularity (even in colder climates), where landlords wish to maximize the rentable area of their buildings. Certain features of an industrial building are excluded from the calculation of area, including canopies, unenclosed connecting links, unenclosed exterior staircases or fire escapes and unenclosed shipping/receiving platforms. The main condition for an area to be excluded is that it exists beyond the measure line.

Important Points

  • The Measure Line in the industrial standard replaces Dominant Portion in the office standard. The measure line is either the exterior wall surface (Method A) or the drip line (Method B)
  • The standard recommends using BOMA 1996 for Office if an industrial building is comprised of 51% or more office space.
  • The standard recommends that practitioners should refer to BOMA 1996 when proportionately allocating common areas to multi-tenant buildings
  • A mezzanine is only considered Rentable Area if the mezzanine is fully finished to applicable building codes and when it's appropriateness is agreed upon by both parties (Lessor and Lessee)
Extreme Measures developed this material in response to queries regarding BOMA measuring standards. This information should be used for reference purposes only. Neither BOMA or Extreme Measures Inc. endorses the information provided. For complete information, please refer to the official publications of BOMA International.